540.373.0703
725 Caroline Street 
Fredericksburg, VA  22401
Store Hours
Monday - Saturday: 10 AM - 6 PM
Sunday:                      12 PM - 6 PM
Ireland - My final resting place

Cremations in Ireland? 
There are Cremations in Ireland but it is not as common as the traditional funeral burial. Cremations are however becoming more popular, especially for ex-pats returning home to a final resting place. A number of Companies offer a service for the scattering of ashes in a favorite place that the deceased would have chosen or liked. 

God looked around His garden and found an empty place.
He then looked down upon the earth and saw your tired face.
He put his arms around you and lifted you to rest.
God’s garden must be beautiful. He always takes the best.
He saw the road was getting rough and the hills were hard to climb,
So He closed your weary eyelids and whispered "Peace be thine".
It broke our hearts to lose you but you didn’t go alone,
For part of us went with you - the day God called you home.

Ashes Scattering
Reméire offer an Ashes Scattering service in Ireland. They can arrange all details including collection of the ashes at their current location, shipment to Ireland and all details in Ireland. With many years experience in the funeral and memorial business in Ireland, we can assure you of the respect, dignity and honor your loved one deserves on their journey to their final resting-place. 

You can choose to scatter your loved ones Ashes at sea or at a location of special importance to you or to your loved one. This might be a scenic location or near a town or location of origin. Special locations that might be considered include the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare, Monasterboice Abbey or Carlingford Lough in County Louth, the River Shannon, the Wicklow Mountains, Galway or the Aran Islands. 

They can tailor the occasion to fulfill your wishes and would be happy to discuss the details with you. What they would ask for initially is for you to email them with your thoughts and what you would like to do and they will contact you by return to discuss. Please indicate if you would prefer for them to contact you by email or by phone. 

Funeral Service
They can also arrange a complete funeral service in Ireland. Their company has a close association with Funeral Directors in all parts of Ireland and they would be happy to discuss your ideas for arranging a very special and unique funeral service in Ireland. Please indicate if you would prefer for them to contact you by email or by phone.


How to write a eulogy
A eulogy is a public farewell to someone you love. It is your last opportunity to tell the world how much that person
 meant to you. It can bring comfort to the bereaved and make a funeral service very personal indeed. A eulogy may be given in a 
church, synagogue, a funeral home or at the graveside. If there is a religious ceremony it is always courteous to speak to a clergyman
or woman about giving a eulogy and to get their guidance as to length and content.

What to include:
A thank you to all those who have come to the funeral to share 
your sorrow. 
A very short potted history of the deceased and a mention of
 his/her personality/ interests/lifestyle. 
A touch of humour can be very helpful especially if the deceased 
was known to enjoy a good laugh. 
An incident that displayed the goodness/kindness/generosity of 
the deceased. 
An explanation of what the deceased meant to you personally. 

What not to say:
Anything that would be hurtful to the mourners such as a mention 
of alcoholism or drug taking. 
Any mention of family discord. 
Anything that would show the deceased in a poor light. 
That is not to say that you should make him or her out to be an 
angel but as we have always been told, you should never speak
 ill of the dead. So never mention his/hr bad points instead 
concentrate on his/her virtues. 
Any lengthy story. A funeral eulogy should be short. 

How to End:
If the deceased had a belief in the afterlife you could end your 
eulogy by saying that you know they are enjoying the heavenly 
reward which they deserved pr that they will always be remembered. 
If the deceased had no religious conviction then you should simply
 say that you hope they have found peace. 

Returning the remains for an Irish Burial.

Flying with Cremation Urns & Cremains 
When traveling with cremated remains the TSA (Transportation Security 
Administration) has a few simple guidelines to ensure that flying with a cremation doesn't involve any unexpected surprises. 

The TSA outlines two options :
Carry-On Luggage: When bringing a cremation urn on-board a plane, the TSA 
has one guideline: the urn must be able to pass through an x-ray machine. 
It is important to know prior to traveling if your urn is accepted by the TSA for 
travel in cabin. Cremation urns that do not meet this requirement will not be admitted on-board .

Checked Baggage: To carry a cremation urn on-board the plane as checked baggage, the TSA must successfully screen the container. Please note, under no circumstances will the TSA open a cremation urn out of respect for the deceased. As with all luggage, the TSA will screen the cremation urn for explosive materials and devices using a variety of methods. If the urn passes screening it will be allowed as checked baggage. Currently, some airlines do not allow cremation urns/cremated remains to be transported in checked baggage. It is important when traveling to contact your airline prior to traveling .

Cremation Urn Materials Permitted for use as Carry-On Luggage
Cremation urns are made from a wide variety of materials. The TSA can permit certain materials through their x-ray which can be properly analyzed. If you are uncertain whether a particular urn can be passed through TSA x-ray equipment contact the TSA.
Permitted Urns can be:
Wood Cremation Urns 
Biodegradable Materials (Paper, Bark, etc.) 
Selected Cultured Marble Urns
The Perfect Urn Vault Series

Other Important Considerations:
Notification that an Irish citizen has died abroad Notify the Irish Embassy of the death of an Irish Citizen abroad. 
They will have the next of kin in Ireland notified.
Formal identification The remains will need to be formally identified by a relative or working companion in compliance with the laws in the country where the death occurred. If this is not possible a family member may be required to travel to identify the person. 
Appointing a funeral director You will need to appoint a funeral director in the country where the death occurred to prepare the remains for travel and make the arrangements for transportation. A Funeral director in Ireland will also be required and will be able to assist. The funeral director can also prepare the appropriate documentation and obtain the death certificate.
Clearance from the coroner Returning a remains to Ireland must be cleared with the coroner in Ireland. If you have appointed a funeral director in Ireland, the funeral director will contact the appropriate coroner with the required documentation. The appropriate documentation in relation to the deceased has to be made available to the coroner for clearance by the coroner's office. 

The documentation required includes
Medical certificate giving cause of death. 
Certification of post-mortem examination.. 
Authorization to remove the body from the other country. 
Certificate that the body is not coming from an area of infectious disease 
The Irish Coroner reserves the right to examine the body.

Funeral arrangements Funeral arrangements in Ireland should not be confirmed until the coroner's office has cleared the documentation. International regulations (Article 3 of the League of Nations International Regulations concerning the conveyance of corpses, 1937 and the Council of Europe Agreement on the Transfer of Corpses 1973) require all coffins crossing international frontiers by air or sea to be metal (zinc or lead) lined and sealed. 
Registering the death If the death is registered in the country where the person died, it is not normally registered in Ireland. 

A death certificate is an important legal document, evidence of which is frequently required in Ireland.

Rules 
While Irish embassies provide consular services to Irish nationals abroad, this does not extend to non-EU nationals. 
Rates Returning a deceased person to Ireland is very expensive, depending on the distance to be travelled and other factors. Check whether the person had travel insurance or private medical cover to help cover the costs. Financial assistance with the cost of repatriation of a dead body is not available from the Irish embassy.

How to write an Irish Eulogy

A eulogy is a public farewell to someone you love. It is your last opportunity to tell the world how much that person meant to you. It can bring comfort to the bereaved and make a funeral service very personal indeed. A eulogy may be given in a church, synagogue, a funeral home or at the graveside. If there is religious ceremony it is always courteous to speak to a clergyman or woman about giving a eulogy and to get their guidance as to length and content.

What to include:
A thank you to all those who have come to the funeral to share your sorrow. 
A very short potted history of the deceased and a mention of his/her personality/ interests/lifestyle. A touch of humour can be very helpful especially if the deceased was known to enjoy a good laugh. An incident that displayed the goodness/kindness/generosity of the deceased. An explanation of what the deceased meant to you personally. 

What not to say:
Anything that would be hurtful to the mourners such as a mention of alcoholism or drug taking. Any mention of family discord. Anything that would show the deceased in a poor light. That is not to say that you should make him or her out to be an angel but as we have always been told, you should never speak ill of the dead. So never mention his/her bad points instead concentrate on his/her virtues. Any lengthy story.......................... A funeral eulogy should be short. 

How to End:
If the deceased had a belief in the afterlife you could end your eulogy by saying that you know they are enjoying their heavenly reward which they deserved or that they will always be remembered. If the deceased had no religious conviction then you should simply say that you hope they have found peace. 
Irish Eyes ® 725 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, VA 22401

Store Hours: Monday to Saturday 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM, Sunday 12:00 PM to 6:00 PM